1971 Dodge Challenger -4 SPEED WITH 383 BIG BLOCK-CALI CAR-RT TRIBUTE-SOLID MOPAR- SEE VIDEO

Back To Your ListingNew Search


1971 Dodge Challenger -4 SPEED WITH 383 BIG BLOCK-CALI CAR-RT TRIBUTE-SOLID MOPAR- SEE VIDEO Sale Pending

Click here to view larger images



SOLD

Type:
Used
Year:
1971
Make:
Dodge
Model:
Challenger
Trim:
-4 SPEED WITH 383 BIG BLOCK-CALI CAR-RT TRIBUTE-SOLID MOPAR- SEE VIDEO
Body Style:
2 Door
Stock
235383NSC
Mileage:
17531
Engine Size:
383
Transmission:
Manual
Exterior Color:
J6-Green Go
Interior Color:
Black
Vin:
JH23G1B30XXXX
Condition:
Very Good


North Shore Classics

For More Info Call
Our Internet Manager
At 847.393.7887

1971 Dodge Challenger -4 SPEED WITH 383 BIG BLOCK-CALI CAR-RT TRIBUTE-SOLID MOPAR- SEE VIDEO

HISTORY

The Dodge Challenger is the name of four different generations of American automobiles produced by Dodge in Detroit, Michigan. The Dodge Silver Challenger was produced from 1958 to 1959, as a version of the full-sized Dodge Coronet model. From 1969 to 1974, the second generation Dodge Challenger pony car was built using the Chrysler E platform, sharing major components with the Plymouth Barracuda. The third generation, from 1978 to 1983, was a badge engineered Mitsubishi Galant Lambda compact car. The fourth, and current generation, was introduced in early 2008 as a rival to the evolved fifth generation Ford Mustang and the fifth generation Chevrolet Camaro.

For 1971, the Challenger line up was modified to include a new model, the "Challenger Coupe" with either a I6 or V8 engine, and as the most basic version it had fixed in position quarter windows and a basic black steering wheel with horn button.[15][better source needed]

The performance model was the R/T (Road/Track), with a 383 cu in (6.28 L) "Magnum" V8, rated at 335 bhp (249.8 kW); 300 bhp (223.7 kW) for 1971, due to a drop in compression. The standard transmission was a 3-speed manual. Optional R/T engines were the 375 bhp (279.6 kW) 440 cu in (7.2 L) Magnum, the 390 bhp (290.8 kW) 440 CID Six-Pack and the 425 bhp (316.9 kW) 426 cu in (7.0 L) Hemi. The R/T was available in either the hardtop or convertible. For 1970 only, base hardtop and R/T hardtop models could be ordered with the more luxurious SE specification, which included leather seats, a vinyl roof, a smaller 'formal' rear window, and an overhead interior console that contained three warning lights (door ajar, low fuel, and seatbelts).[16][better source needed] The Challenger R/T came with a Rallye instrument cluster that included a 150 mph (240 km/h) speedometer, an 8,000 rpm tachometer,[17][better source needed] 19721974 tachometer went to 7,000 rpm and an oil pressure gauge. In 1972, the R/T badging was dropped and these models were called "Rallye", although they were never badged as such. The Rallye model featured a faux brake vent on the fenders. The shaker hood scoop was not available after 1971.

Although the body style remained the same throughout the Challenger's five-year run, there were two notable changes to the front grille. The 1971 models had a "split" grille, while 1972 introduced a design that extended the grille (nicknamed the "sad-mouth") beneath the front bumper. With this change to the front end, 1972 through 1974 models had little to no variation. The only way to properly distinguish them is that the 1972s had flush mounted bumpers with no bumper guards, (small bumper guards were optional), while both the 1973 and 1974 models had the protruding "5 mph (8.0 km/h)" bumpers (with a rubber type filler behind them) in conjunction with large bumper guards. The 1974 cars had larger rear bumper guards to meet the (new for 1974 and on) rear 5 mph rear impact law. These changes were made to meet U.S. regulations regarding crash test safety.

The 1970 taillights went all the way across the back of the car, with the backup light in the middle. In 1971, the backup lights were on the left and right instead of the middle. The taillight array also changed for 1972 onwards, with the Challenger now having four individual rectangular lamps.


Although few mourned the end of the E-body models, the passage of time has created legends and highlighted the unique personalities of both the Challenger and the Barracuda.[6] With a low total production, as well as low survivability over the years, any Challenger is worth a substantial amount of money. In a historic review, the editors of Edmunds Inside Line ranked these models as: 1970 was a "great" year, 1971 was a "good" one, and then "three progressively lousier ones" (19721974).[6] With total sales and production off by 2/3 from 1970, the performance engine 1971 Challengers are the most rare. Sales and production of the 1973 cars (with only two V8s available) actually exceeded 1971 by approximately 1,700 cars.


North Shore Classics attempts to provide accurate information on the automobile listed above. The actual equipment may vary. Please confirm all vehicle options, accessories and prices with a sales associate to assure accuracy.

Quick Contact

Finance Calculator



%

months


  
Auto Locator

Be one of the first to get email notification when the vehicle you are looking for is added to our inventory.

Signing up for the Auto Locator Service gives you the inside track to our most up to date inventory and helps you find the vehicle you are looking for.

Signup Now